Zebra mussel [Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas)] colonization of rusty crayfish [Orconectes rusticus (Girard)] in Green Bay, Lake Michigan

John C. Brazner, Douglas A. Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In August 1995 six rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) colonized with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were captured in small-meshed fyke-nets set as part of a fish sampling effort at Peter's Marsh and Long-Tail Point Wetland in lower Green Bay. The number of mussels per crayfish ranged from 16 to 431 and the length of the zebra mussels ranged from 1.2 to 12.0 mm with a mean of 3.6 mm. Mussels colonized virtually all areas of the crayfish bodies but the chelae, telson and uropods and thorax were most heavily colonized. Although it is possible that zebra mussels may have positive effects on crayfish populations through associated effects on water clarity, autotroph and invertebrate production, we are concerned that energetic costs or physical constraints caused by attached zebra mussels may be detrimental to crayfish in the Great Lakes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-256
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Midland Naturalist
Volume143
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2000

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Dreissena polymorpha
Lake Michigan
crayfish
colonization
lake
mussels
autotrophs
Great Lakes
thorax
marshes
marsh
wetlands
tail
energetics
water quality
invertebrate
invertebrates
wetland
sampling
fish

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abstract = "In August 1995 six rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) colonized with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were captured in small-meshed fyke-nets set as part of a fish sampling effort at Peter's Marsh and Long-Tail Point Wetland in lower Green Bay. The number of mussels per crayfish ranged from 16 to 431 and the length of the zebra mussels ranged from 1.2 to 12.0 mm with a mean of 3.6 mm. Mussels colonized virtually all areas of the crayfish bodies but the chelae, telson and uropods and thorax were most heavily colonized. Although it is possible that zebra mussels may have positive effects on crayfish populations through associated effects on water clarity, autotroph and invertebrate production, we are concerned that energetic costs or physical constraints caused by attached zebra mussels may be detrimental to crayfish in the Great Lakes.",
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