Xylem characteristics in Ulmus americana cultivars and their potential use as a preliminary screening method for Dutch elm disease resistance

Garrett L. Beier, Robert A. Blanchette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traditional screening of American elm (Ulmus americana) for resistance to Dutch elm disease (DED) often requires many years between initial propagation of trees and inoculation of older trees in the field. Previously published studies have found an association between smaller vessel diameters and increased resistance to DED, but further validation was needed to determine whether it could provide a rapid screening method to identify candidate trees for further testing. This investigation examined xylem characteristics in main stems of three-year-old trees for five cultivars and two wild-type seedling populations of U. americana with varying levels of resistance to DED. Cultivars with low disease severity ratings tended to have smaller vessel diameters and higher vessel densities than cultivars with high disease severity ratings. Xylem characteristics were also assessed in branches and main stems of larger plant material. Data suggest that the use of main stems is preferential to branches when evaluating large trees, as main stems provided more resolution in differentiating between the genotypes. Results from this study indicate that there is potential for the use of xylem characteristics, such as vessel diameter and vessel density, for selecting trees with putative resistance. However, caution should be used due to the potential effects of the environment, such as the effect of water availability and its impacts on xylem development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12638
JournalForest Pathology
Volume50
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Dr. Benjamin Held, Chad Giblin, Ryan Murphy, Eric Otto, Samuel Redford, Samuel Voss, Tom Frost, Camille Schegel, Alissa Cotton and Shawn Ng for assisting in inoculations, sample processing and data collection. Additionally, we would like to thank Dr. Brett Arenz, Dr. Jennifer Juzwik and Dr. Anthony D'Amato for reviewing this manuscript and for their suggestions. We would like to thank the St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department, Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Department, and Minnesota Landscape Arboretum for allowing us to sample their trees. Project funding was provided by the Minnesota Environmental and Natural Resources Trust Fund, the Minnesota Turf and Grounds Foundation, and USDA Hatch Project MIN‐22‐081.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank Dr. Benjamin Held, Chad Giblin, Ryan Murphy, Eric Otto, Samuel Redford, Samuel Voss, Tom Frost, Camille Schegel, Alissa Cotton and Shawn Ng for assisting in inoculations, sample processing and data collection. Additionally, we would like to thank Dr. Brett Arenz, Dr. Jennifer Juzwik and Dr. Anthony D'Amato for reviewing this manuscript and for their suggestions. We would like to thank the St. Paul Parks and Recreation Department, Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Department, and Minnesota Landscape Arboretum for allowing us to sample their trees. Project funding was provided by the Minnesota Environmental and Natural Resources Trust Fund, the Minnesota Turf and Grounds Foundation, and USDA Hatch Project MIN-22-081.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Wiley-VCH GmbH

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