X-pol potential: An electronic structure-based force field for molecular dynamics simulation of a solvated protein in water

Wangshen Xie, Modesto Orozco, Donald G. Truhlar, Jiali Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A recently proposed electronic structure-based force field called the explicit polarization (X-Pol) potential is used to study many-body electronic polarization effects in a protein, in particular by carrying out a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) in water with periodic boundary conditions. The primary unit cell is cubic with dimensions 54 × 54 × 54 Å3, and the total number of atoms in this cell is 14281. An approximate electronic wave function, consisting of 29026 basis functions for the entire system, is variationally optimized to give the minimum Born-Oppenheimer energy at every MD step; this allows the efficient evaluation of the required analytic forces for the dynamics. Intramolecular and intermolecular polarization and intramolecular charge transfer effects are examined and are found to be significant; for example, 17 out of 58 backbone carbonyls differ from neutrality on average by more than 0.1 electron, and the average charge on the six alanines varies from -0.05 to +0.09. The instantaneous excess charges vary even more widely; the backbone carbonyls have standard deviations in their fluctuating net charges from 0.03 to 0.05, and more than half of the residues have excess charges whose standard deviation exceeds 0.05. We conclude that the new-generation X-Pol force field permits the inclusion of timedependent quantum mechanical polarization and charge transfer effects in much larger systems than was previously possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-467
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Chemical Theory and Computation
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 10 2009

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