WSSMP: A high-performance serial and parallel symmetric sparse linear solver

Anshul Gupta, Mahesh Joshi, Vipin Kumar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Watson Symmetric Sparse Matrix Package, WSSMP, is a high-performance, robust, and easy to use software package for solving large sparse symmetric systems of linear equations. It can can be used as a serial package, or in a shared-memory multiprocessor environment, or as a scalable parallel solver in a message-passing environment, where each node can either be a uniprocessor or a shared-memory multiprocessor. WSSMP uses scalable parallel multifrontal algorithms for sparse symmetric factorization and triangular solves. Sparse symmetric factorization in WSSMP has been clocked at up to 210 MFLOPS on an RS6000/590, 500 MFLOPS on an RS6000/397 and in excess of 20 GFLOPS on a 64-node SP with RS6000/397 nodes. This paper gives an overview of the algorithms, implementation aspects, performance results, and the user interface of WSSMP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationApplied Parallel Computing
Subtitle of host publicationLarge Scale Scientific and Industrial Problems - 4th International Workshop, PARA 1998, Proceedings
EditorsBo Kagstrom, Erik Elmroth, Jack Dongarra, Jerzy Wasniewski
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages182-194
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)3540654143, 9783540654148
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Event4th International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing, PARA 1998 - Umea, Sweden
Duration: Jun 14 1998Jun 17 1998

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume1541
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other4th International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing, PARA 1998
CountrySweden
CityUmea
Period6/14/986/17/98

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