Words and bodies: A discourse on male sexuality in late eighteenth-century English representational practices

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Abstract

In 1772, William Kenrick published Love in the Suds, a direct attack on David Garrick. In 1776, Humphrey Nettle [William Jackson] published Sodom and Onan, a satire against Samuel Foote. Both of these texts make explicit charges of homosexuality against the two men. Why were these two actors singled out at this particular moment: serendipity or a new mechanism of power? An examination, thus, is required, of the representational practices operating within and without theatre, through which accepted sexual practices and new forms of personhood were normalized and put into discourse in late eighteenth-century London. The fact that this was to be achieved by placing actor's image and actor's body, occupying an ambiguous social position, under close scrutiny, points to a new economy in performing cultural and societal norms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalTheatre Research International
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2003

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