Why do I teach? A mixed-methods study of in-service teachers’ motivations, autonomy-supportive instruction, and emotions

Alyssa Parr, Jessica Gladstone, Emily Rosenzweig, Ming Te Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The overreliance on quantitative methods in teacher motivation studies has limited our understanding of the content and function of teachers’ motivations. Through teacher interviews (n = 16; 100% White; 63% female; 2–21 years of experience) and surveys (n = 124; 96% White; 57% female; 0.5–40 years of experience), this study used mixed-methods approaches to explore what motivates teachers to teach and how those motivations relate to teachers’ autonomy-supportive instruction and teaching emotions. Findings revealed that teachers who intrinsically valued their content area fostered more understanding, linked social utility value to positive emotions, and associated their teaching ability with favorable instructional and emotional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number103228
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume98
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Quantitative data in this study was collected with the support of the National Science Foundation Grant 1315943 and the third author was supported by the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Grant 1714481 .

Keywords

  • Autonomy-supportive instruction
  • FIT-Choice
  • Mixed-methods
  • Teacher motivations
  • Teaching emotions

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