“Why can't we admire our own?”: Indigenous youth, farming, and education in the peruvian andes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the Mantaro Valley of Peru, Wanka youth are raised participating in family and community-scale farming. When viewed as an Indigenous and rural cultural practice, farming can be seen as reflective of an ecologically-conscious and spiritually-based system of reciprocity. Central to this system is the teaching of values that emphasize interrelationships between human beings, their lands, histories, and foods. At the same time, farming is also viewed in Peruvian dominant society as a peasant activity of the uneducated poora stigmatization that distances the rural Indigenous farmer from mainstream notions of progress, development, and modernity. In this chapter, these tensions are highlighted through ethnographic research on the experiences of Indigenous youth who participate in educational opportunities that will influence who they want to be and what their communities will become.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIndigenous Innovation
Subtitle of host publicationUniversalities and Peculiarities
PublisherSense Publishers
Pages129-148
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9789463002264
ISBN (Print)9789463002257
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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  • Cite this

    Huaman, E. S. (2015). “Why can't we admire our own?”: Indigenous youth, farming, and education in the peruvian andes. In Indigenous Innovation: Universalities and Peculiarities (pp. 129-148). Sense Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6300-226-4_8