White slaves, African masters

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article introduces narratives by American captives during and after the Barbary Wars (1801-1805, 1815). Set against a background of American imperial pursuits, the accounts reveal the hypocrisy and double-standards common among early Americans (who accepted black slavery in America but reacted strongly against the idea of white slaves in the custody of the North African Muslims). The accounts were largely works of fiction, but were accepted as fact. Arabs are presented as bizarre, gruesome, and primitive. The stories were sold by the thousands, so members of almost every household were exposed to these negative portrayals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-111
Number of pages22
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume588
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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child custody
slavery
slave
Arab
Muslim
narrative

Keywords

  • Barbary captivity
  • Eighteenth and nineteenth-century America
  • Narratives
  • North African history
  • Race
  • Slavery
  • Stereotypes

Cite this

White slaves, African masters. / Baepler, Paul M.

In: Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 588, 01.01.2003, p. 90-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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