Where the lay and the technical meet: Using an anthropology of interfaces to explain persistent reproductive health disparities in West Africa

Yannick Jaffré, Siri Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite impressive global investment in reproductive health programs in West Africa, maternal mortality remains unacceptably high and obstetric care is often inadequate. Fertility is among the highest in the world, while contraceptive prevalence remains among the lowest. This paper explores the social and technical dimensions of this situation. We argue that effective reproductive health programs require analyzing the interfaces between technical programs and the social logics and behaviors of health professionals and client populations. Significant gaps between health programs' goals and the behaviors of patients and health care professionals have been observed. While public health projects aim to manage reproduction, sexuality, fertility, and professional practices are regulated socially. Such projects may target technical practices, but access to care is greatly influenced by social norms and ethics. This paper shows how an empirical anthropology that investigates the social and technical interfaces of reproduction can contribute to improved global health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume156
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • Ethnography
  • Fertility
  • Gender
  • Health personnel
  • Reproductive health
  • Sexuality
  • West Africa

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