Where are the labor markets? Examining the association between structural racism in labor markets and infant birth weight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Racist policies and practices that restrict Black, as compared to white workers, from employment may drive racial inequities in birth outcomes among workers. This study examined the association between structural racism in labor markets, measured at a commuting zone where workers live and commute to work, and low-birthweight birth. We found the deleterious effect of structural racism in labor markets among US-born Southern Black pregnant people of working age, but not among African- or Caribbean-born counterparts in any US region. Our analysis highlights the intersections of structural racism, culture, migration, and history of racial oppression that vary across regions and birth outcomes of Black workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102742
JournalHealth and Place
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This project was supported by the Minnesota Population Center, which is funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institute of Health (Grant P2C HD041023 ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

Keywords

  • Birthweight
  • Health equity
  • Labor markets
  • Structural racism
  • Workers

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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