What we know and need to know about the consequences of high-stakes testing for students with disabilities

Jim Ysseldyke, J. Ruth Nelson, Sandra Christenson, David R. Johnson, Amanda Dennison, Heidi Triezenberg, Michael Sharpe, Maureen Hawes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many positive and negative consequences of high-stakes testing for students with disabilities are alleged. Yet, there is little evidence on actual consequences. Both anecdotal and empirical evidence were reviewed with regard to increased participation in assessment, raised expectations, provision of appropriate assessment accommodations, alignment of individualized education programs (IEPs) to standards and assessments, improved access to general education, improved instruction, changes in promotion and grade advancement decisions, graduation and diploma options, test stress, and improved educational outcomes. Data needed to make judgments about intended and unintended consequences of high-stakes testing are also analyzed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-94
Number of pages20
JournalExceptional children
Volume71
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

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