What Gay and Bisexual Men Treated for Prostate Cancer are Offered and Attempt as Sexual Rehabilitation for Prostate Cancer: Results from the Restore Study

B. R.Simon Rosser, Badrinath R. Konety, Darryl Mitteldorf, Nidhi Kohli, Lindsey Lesher, William West, Benjamin D. Capistrant, James DeWitt, Enyinnaya Merengwa, Gunna Kilian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This is the first known study to investigate what gay and bisexual men are offered and what they try as rehabilitation to address the sexual and urinary effects of prostate cancer treatment. Methods: A total of 193 gay and bisexual men with prostate cancer were recruited from a large male cancer survivor support and advocacy website. Online participants completed survey questions asking what rehabilitation treatments were offered, what they tried and what their satisfaction was with outcomes. Results: Most participants (68.4%) reported being out as gay/bisexual to at least 1 cancer specialist. Only 8.8% reported that a sexual history was taken. The most common problems reported were loss of ejaculate (93.8%), erectile difficulties (89.6%), change in sense of orgasm (87.0%), loss of sexual confidence (76.7%), changes to the penis (65.8%), increased pain in receptive anal sex (64.8%), urinary incontinence not related to sex (64.2%) and urinary incontinence during sex (49.2%). Of these factors only loss of ejaculate, erectile difficulties and nonsexual urinary problems were commonly discussed by clinicians during prostate cancer treatment. Satisfaction with specific rehabilitation options varied widely. Conclusions: Treatment for prostate cancer lacks adequate history taking and consensus around rehabilitation practices, resulting in idiosyncratic approaches to rehabilitation. Four clinical questions may improve outcomes. Prostate cancer specialists need education to become culturally competent in addressing the unique needs of gay and bisexual patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-191
Number of pages5
JournalUrology Practice
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Rehabilitation
Urinary Incontinence
Orgasm
Sexual Minorities
Penis
Therapeutics
Sexual Behavior
Survivors
Neoplasms
Consensus
Education
Pain

Keywords

  • erectile dysfunction
  • prostatic neoplasms
  • sexual and gender minorities
  • sexual behavior
  • urinary incontinence

Cite this

What Gay and Bisexual Men Treated for Prostate Cancer are Offered and Attempt as Sexual Rehabilitation for Prostate Cancer : Results from the Restore Study. / Rosser, B. R.Simon; Konety, Badrinath R.; Mitteldorf, Darryl; Kohli, Nidhi; Lesher, Lindsey; West, William; Capistrant, Benjamin D.; DeWitt, James; Merengwa, Enyinnaya; Kilian, Gunna.

In: Urology Practice, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 187-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosser, B. R.Simon ; Konety, Badrinath R. ; Mitteldorf, Darryl ; Kohli, Nidhi ; Lesher, Lindsey ; West, William ; Capistrant, Benjamin D. ; DeWitt, James ; Merengwa, Enyinnaya ; Kilian, Gunna. / What Gay and Bisexual Men Treated for Prostate Cancer are Offered and Attempt as Sexual Rehabilitation for Prostate Cancer : Results from the Restore Study. In: Urology Practice. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 187-191.
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