What can you teach about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 30 seconds? Evaluation of a television campaign

Hendrika Meischke, John Finnegan, Mickey Eisenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluated an 8-month media campaign, implemented in western Washington, to educate people on the basic steps of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for cardiac arrest. A telephone survey was conducted with a total of 384 adults randomly selected from two towns, one that had been exposed to the campaign (intervention town) and one that had not been exposed to the campaign (comparison town). Results showed that respondents in the intervention town were more likely than respondents in the comparison town to report (a) having heard messages on CPR in the past month, (b) having seen the CPR media campaign, and (c) knowing the three basic steps of CPR. Respondents who had seen the campaign evaluated it very favorably. There were no differences between respondent groups in self-reported CPR training or intentions to perform CPR, suggesting that the campaign had a greater impact on knowledge and awareness than on intentions trod behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-59
Number of pages16
JournalEvaluation and the Health Professions
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1999

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'What can you teach about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 30 seconds? Evaluation of a television campaign'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this