Weight gain prevention among midlifewomen: A randomized controlled trial to address needs related to the physical and social environment

Courtney D. Perry, Dennis Degeneffe, Cynthia Davey, Grace Kollannoor-Samuel, Marla Reicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years) increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354) in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185) received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169) received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48). Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number530
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Eating occasions
  • Environment
  • Midlife
  • Weight gain prevention
  • Women

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