Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel

Jessica Schoner, Jason Cao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Planners are increasingly promoting active travel as a strategy to reduce auto dependence and encourage physical activity. That rail transit promotes walking to the extent that passengers typically access stations by walking is evident. However, few studies focus on the carryover effect of light rail and associated built environment features on additional pedestrian travel. This study explored the effects of light rail and the built environment on the frequency of utilitarian walking (shopping trips) and recreational walking (strolling) from 1,303 randomly surveyed residents in five corridors in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Results from two negative binomial regression models showed that after controlling Tor demographics, travel attitudes, and residential preferences, walking to the store was significantly associated with population density, proximity to commercial land use, and street network interruptions (cul-de-sacs and dead-end streets). Strolling was also associated with street network interruptions. The findings carry important implications for planners to capitalize on built environment improvements around new light rail projects to increase rates of walking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransportation Research Record
PublisherNational Research Council
Pages67-76
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780309295567
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Publication series

NameTransportation Research Record
Volume2464
ISSN (Print)0361-1981

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Cite this

Schoner, J., & Cao, J. (2014). Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel. In Transportation Research Record (pp. 67-76). (Transportation Research Record; Vol. 2464). National Research Council. https://doi.org/10.3141/2464-09

Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel. / Schoner, Jessica; Cao, Jason.

Transportation Research Record. National Research Council, 2014. p. 67-76 (Transportation Research Record; Vol. 2464).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Schoner, J & Cao, J 2014, Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel. in Transportation Research Record. Transportation Research Record, vol. 2464, National Research Council, pp. 67-76. https://doi.org/10.3141/2464-09
Schoner J, Cao J. Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel. In Transportation Research Record. National Research Council. 2014. p. 67-76. (Transportation Research Record). https://doi.org/10.3141/2464-09
Schoner, Jessica ; Cao, Jason. / Walking for purpose and pleasure influences of light rail, built environment, and residential self-selection on pedestrian travel. Transportation Research Record. National Research Council, 2014. pp. 67-76 (Transportation Research Record).
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