VE/VCO2 slope in lean and overweight women and its relationship to lean leg mass

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Abstract

Ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2slope) is used clinically to determine cardiorespiratory fitness and morbidity in heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated that lower lean leg mass is associated with high VE/VCO2slope during exercise in HF. In healthy individuals, we evaluated 1) whether VE/VCO2slope differed between lean and overweight women and 2) the relationship between lean leg mass and VE/VCO2slope in overweight sedentary (OWS), overweight trained (OWTR) and lean, trained (LTR) women. Methods: Gas exchange and ventilation were collected during a treadmill peak oxygen uptake test (VO2peak) in 40 women [26 OWS (29 ± 7 yrs., mean ± SD), 7 OWTR (33 ± 5 yrs) and 7 LTR (26 ± 6 yrs)]. Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: VO2peak was highest in LTR (46.6 ± 8 ml/kg/min) compared with OWTR (38.1 ± 4.9 ml/kg/min) and OWS women (25.3 ± 4.8 ml/kg/min, p < 0.05). Lean leg mass was highest in OWTR and lowest in LTR women (p < 0.05). VE/VCO2slope was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Higher lean leg mass was associated with lower VE/VCO2slope in overweight women (OWS + OWTR: r = −0.55, p < 0.001), contrasting with higher VE/VCO2slope in LTR women (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings suggest VE/VCO2slope may not differentiate between low and high cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy individuals and muscle mass may play a role in determining the VE/VCO2slope, independent of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-110
Number of pages4
JournalIJC Heart and Vasculature
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

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Leg
Ventilation
Heart Failure
Photon Absorptiometry
Body Composition
Carbon Dioxide
Gases
Exercise
Oxygen
Morbidity
Muscles

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Obesity
  • Peak VO
  • V/VCO
  • Ventilatory efficiency

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "VE/VCO2 slope in lean and overweight women and its relationship to lean leg mass",
abstract = "Ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2slope) is used clinically to determine cardiorespiratory fitness and morbidity in heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated that lower lean leg mass is associated with high VE/VCO2slope during exercise in HF. In healthy individuals, we evaluated 1) whether VE/VCO2slope differed between lean and overweight women and 2) the relationship between lean leg mass and VE/VCO2slope in overweight sedentary (OWS), overweight trained (OWTR) and lean, trained (LTR) women. Methods: Gas exchange and ventilation were collected during a treadmill peak oxygen uptake test (VO2peak) in 40 women [26 OWS (29 ± 7 yrs., mean ± SD), 7 OWTR (33 ± 5 yrs) and 7 LTR (26 ± 6 yrs)]. Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: VO2peak was highest in LTR (46.6 ± 8 ml/kg/min) compared with OWTR (38.1 ± 4.9 ml/kg/min) and OWS women (25.3 ± 4.8 ml/kg/min, p < 0.05). Lean leg mass was highest in OWTR and lowest in LTR women (p < 0.05). VE/VCO2slope was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Higher lean leg mass was associated with lower VE/VCO2slope in overweight women (OWS + OWTR: r = −0.55, p < 0.001), contrasting with higher VE/VCO2slope in LTR women (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings suggest VE/VCO2slope may not differentiate between low and high cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy individuals and muscle mass may play a role in determining the VE/VCO2slope, independent of disease.",
keywords = "Body composition, Obesity, Peak VO, V/VCO, Ventilatory efficiency",
author = "Keller-Ross, {Manda L} and Chantigian, {Daniel P.} and Evanoff, {Nicholas G} and Bantle, {Anne E} and Dengel, {Donald R} and Chow, {Lisa S}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijcha.2018.10.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "107--110",
journal = "IJC Heart and Vasculature",
issn = "2352-9067",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - VE/VCO2 slope in lean and overweight women and its relationship to lean leg mass

AU - Keller-Ross, Manda L

AU - Chantigian, Daniel P.

AU - Evanoff, Nicholas G

AU - Bantle, Anne E

AU - Dengel, Donald R

AU - Chow, Lisa S

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2slope) is used clinically to determine cardiorespiratory fitness and morbidity in heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated that lower lean leg mass is associated with high VE/VCO2slope during exercise in HF. In healthy individuals, we evaluated 1) whether VE/VCO2slope differed between lean and overweight women and 2) the relationship between lean leg mass and VE/VCO2slope in overweight sedentary (OWS), overweight trained (OWTR) and lean, trained (LTR) women. Methods: Gas exchange and ventilation were collected during a treadmill peak oxygen uptake test (VO2peak) in 40 women [26 OWS (29 ± 7 yrs., mean ± SD), 7 OWTR (33 ± 5 yrs) and 7 LTR (26 ± 6 yrs)]. Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: VO2peak was highest in LTR (46.6 ± 8 ml/kg/min) compared with OWTR (38.1 ± 4.9 ml/kg/min) and OWS women (25.3 ± 4.8 ml/kg/min, p < 0.05). Lean leg mass was highest in OWTR and lowest in LTR women (p < 0.05). VE/VCO2slope was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Higher lean leg mass was associated with lower VE/VCO2slope in overweight women (OWS + OWTR: r = −0.55, p < 0.001), contrasting with higher VE/VCO2slope in LTR women (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings suggest VE/VCO2slope may not differentiate between low and high cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy individuals and muscle mass may play a role in determining the VE/VCO2slope, independent of disease.

AB - Ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2slope) is used clinically to determine cardiorespiratory fitness and morbidity in heart failure (HF). Previously, we demonstrated that lower lean leg mass is associated with high VE/VCO2slope during exercise in HF. In healthy individuals, we evaluated 1) whether VE/VCO2slope differed between lean and overweight women and 2) the relationship between lean leg mass and VE/VCO2slope in overweight sedentary (OWS), overweight trained (OWTR) and lean, trained (LTR) women. Methods: Gas exchange and ventilation were collected during a treadmill peak oxygen uptake test (VO2peak) in 40 women [26 OWS (29 ± 7 yrs., mean ± SD), 7 OWTR (33 ± 5 yrs) and 7 LTR (26 ± 6 yrs)]. Body composition was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: VO2peak was highest in LTR (46.6 ± 8 ml/kg/min) compared with OWTR (38.1 ± 4.9 ml/kg/min) and OWS women (25.3 ± 4.8 ml/kg/min, p < 0.05). Lean leg mass was highest in OWTR and lowest in LTR women (p < 0.05). VE/VCO2slope was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Higher lean leg mass was associated with lower VE/VCO2slope in overweight women (OWS + OWTR: r = −0.55, p < 0.001), contrasting with higher VE/VCO2slope in LTR women (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings suggest VE/VCO2slope may not differentiate between low and high cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy individuals and muscle mass may play a role in determining the VE/VCO2slope, independent of disease.

KW - Body composition

KW - Obesity

KW - Peak VO

KW - V/VCO

KW - Ventilatory efficiency

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