Vibrational spectroscopy reveals electrostatic and electrochemical doping in organic thin film transistors gated with a polymer electrolyte dielectric

L. G. Kaake, Y. Zou, M. J. Panzer, C. D. Frisbie, X. Y. Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Scopus citations

Abstract

We apply attenuated total internal reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to directly probe active layers in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). The OTFT studied uses the n-type organic semiconductor N-N′-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C8) and a polymer electrolyte gate dielectric made from poly(ethylene oxide) and LiClO4. FTIR spectroscopy of the device shows signatures of anionic PTCDI-C8 species and broad polaron bands when the organic semiconductor layer is doped under positive gate bias (VG). There are two distinctive doping regions: a reversible and electrostatic doping region for VG ≤ 2 V and an irreversible and electrochemical doping regime for VG > 2 V. On the basis of intensity loss of vibrational peaks attributed to neutral PTCDI-C8, we obtain a charge carrier density of 2.9 × 10 14/cm2 at VG = 2 V; this charge injection density corresponds to the conversion of slightly more than one monolayer of PTCDI-C8 molecules into anions. At higher gate bias voltage, electrochemical doping involving the intercalation of Li+ into the organic semiconductor film can convert all PTCDI-C8 molecules in a 30-nm film into anionic species. For comparison, when a conventional gate dielectric (polystyrene) is used, the maximum charge carrier density achievable at V G = 200 V is ∼4.5 × 1013/cm2, which corresponds to the conversion of 18% of a monolayer of PTCDI-C8 molecules into anions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7824-7830
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume129
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2007

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