Veterans’ views of PARTNER-MH, a peer-led patient navigation intervention, to improve patient engagement in care and patient-clinician communication: A qualitative study

Johanne Eliacin, Marianne S. Matthias, Kenzie A. Cameron, Diana J. Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: In this study, we report on participants’ experiences of PARTNER-MH, a peer-led, patient-navigation intervention for racially and ethnically minoritized patients in Veterans Health Administration mental health services aimed at improving patient engagement in care and patient-clinician communication. Participants described their views of PARTNER-MH, barriers and facilitators to the intervention's implementation, and their application of varied intervention concepts to improve engagement in care and communication with their mental health clinicians. Methods: This is a qualitative analysis of the PARTNER-MH pilot randomized controlled trial. Participants participated in semi-structured interviews guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Rapid data analysis approach was used to analyze the data. Results: Participants (n = 13) perceived PARTNER-MH as an acceptable intervention, and viewed use of peers as interventionists, long-term outreach and engagement efforts, and navigation services favorably. Barriers to implementation included limited flexibility in peers’ schedules and lack of peer/participant gender concordance, as well as limited options for program delivery modality. Three main themes summarized participants’ views and perceived benefits of PARTNER-MH that contributed to improved patient-clinician communication: 1) increased patient engagement, 2) improved patient-clinician relationship, and 3) enhanced communication self-efficacy. Conclusions: Participants viewed PARTNER-MH as beneficial and identified several intervention components that contributed to improved engagement in care, communication self-efficacy, and patient-clinician communication. Practice implication: Some patients, especially minoritized patients and those who have been disenfranchised from healthcare systems may benefit from peer-led interventions that facilitate engagement in care and communication self-efficacy to improve patient-clinician communication and healthcare outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04515771.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107847
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by a VA HSR&D Career Development Award −2 16–153 to Dr. Eliacin. It also received support from the VA HSR&D Center for Health Information and Communication, the Regenstrief Institute, and the Academy of Communication in Healthcare Putnam Scholars Program.

Funding Information:
The clinical trial from which this analysis was conducted was supported by a VA HSR&D Career Development Award ( 16−153 ) to Dr. Eliacin This research was also supported by an Academy of Communication in Healthcare Putnam Scholar Fellowship awarded to Dr. Eliacin.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023

Keywords

  • Communication self-efficacy
  • Healthcare disparities
  • Mental health
  • Patient navigation
  • Patient-clinician communication
  • Peer-led intervention
  • Veterans

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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