Ventricular ectopy in patients with left ventricular dysfunction: Should it be treated?

Taibo Chen, Ryan Koene, David G Benditt, Fei Lü

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) are commonly encountered in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Frequent ventricular ectopy can be associated with deterioration of cardiac function and may lead to VPC-induced cardiomyopathy. VPC-induced inter- and/or intraventricular dyssynchrony has been postulated as the main mechanism underlying VPC-induced left ventricular dysfunction. For risk stratification, VPCs in the setting of CHF can not be regarded to be a benign arrhythmia as in an apparently healthy subject. However, any potential survival benefits to be derived from suppression of VPCs or nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in CHF may be offset by the negative inotropic and proarrhythmic effects of antiarrhythmic drugs and may be masked by the risk of death that is already high in this subgroup of patients. β-Blockers are currently considered to be the first-line therapy, with amiodarone as a back-up. Catheter ablation, although invasive and not without procedural risk, avoids the common adverse effects of currently available antiarrhythmic medications. From a standpoint of preventing or reversing left ventricular dysfunction, frequent VPCs should be treated earlier regardless of their site of origin or the presence of associated symptoms, such as palpitations. Catheter ablation may be the preferable approach in selected patients, particularly when β-blocker therapy has been ineffective or not tolerated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-49
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Keywords

  • Catheter ablation
  • congestive heart failure
  • mortality
  • tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy
  • ventricular premature complexes

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