Utilization of Cardiac Surveillance Tests in Survivors of Breast Cancer and Lymphoma after Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy

Kathryn J. Ruddy, Lindsey R. Sangaralingham, Holly Van Houten, Somaira Nowsheen, Nicole Sandhu, Javid Moslehi, Heather Neuman, Ahmedin Jemal, Tufia C. Haddad, Anne H. Blaes, Hector R. Villarraga, Carrie Thompson, Nilay D. Shah, Joerg Herrmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend consideration of the use of echocardiography 6 to 12 months after completion of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in at-risk populations. Assessment of BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) has also been suggested by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Failure Society of America for the identification of Stage A (at risk) heart failure patients. The real-world frequency of the use of these tests in patients after receipt of anthracycline therapy, however, has not been studied previously. Methods and Results: In this retrospective study, using administrative claims data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse, we identified 31 447 breast cancer and lymphoma patients (age ≥18 years) who were treated with an anthracycline in the United States between January 1, 2008 and January 31, 2018. Continuous medical and pharmacy coverage was required for at least 6 months before the initial anthracycline dose and 12 months after the final dose. Only 36.1% of patients had any type of cardiac surveillance (echocardiography, BNP, or cardiac imaging) in the year following completion of anthracycline therapy (29.7% echocardiography). Surveillance rate increased from 37.5% in 2008 to 42.7% in 2018 (25.6% in 2008 to 40.5% echocardiography in 2018). Lymphoma patients had a lower likelihood of any surveillance compared with patients with breast cancer (odds ratio, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.74-0.85]; P<0.001). Patients with preexisting diagnoses of coronary artery disease and arrhythmia had the highest likelihood of cardiac surveillance (odds ratio, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.39-1.69] and odds ratio, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.3-1.53]; P<0.001 for both), although no single comorbidity was associated with a >50% rate of surveillance. Conclusions: The majority of survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who have received anthracycline-based chemotherapy do not undergo cardiac surveillance after treatment, including those with a history of cardiovascular comorbidities, such as heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere005984
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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