Using sexually explicit material in adult sex education: An eighteen year comparative analysis

B. R. Simon Rosser, S. Margretta Dwyer, Eli Coleman, Michael Miner, Michael Metz, Beatrice E. Robinson, Walter O. Bockting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Evaluating 7451 adults' responses to viewing sexually explicit material during Sexual Attitude Reassessment (SAR) seminars held from 1972 to 1991 is the focus of this study. Almost all reported experiencing these media as not harmful, and reported positive responses to the explicit visual material. Evidence of a double standard was also found: namely, while almost all viewed the seminar as not harmful to themselves, a significantly smaller proportion viewed it as not harmful to others. Respondents in the more liberals 1970s were more likely to view the seminar as not harmful than those in the more conservative 1980s. Sexually explicit media were viewed as the most helpful aspect of the seminar by most participants, and judged valuable both in assisting participants explore their issues and concerns, and in helping them clarify their emotional response to aspects of sexuality. The evidence suggests that sexually explicit material is a valuable tool in adult sex education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-128
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Sex Education and Therapy
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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