Using ripple effect mapping to evaluate program impact: Choosing or combining the methods that work best for you

Mary Emery, Lorie Higgins, Scott Chazdon, Debra Hansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A mind mapping approach to evaluation called Ripple Effects Mapping (REM) has been developed and used by a number of Extension faculty across the country recently. This article describes three approaches to REM, as well as key differences and similarities. The authors, each from different landgrant institutions, believe REM is an effective way to document direct and indirect impacts of community development programs while providing an opportunity for reflection and inspiration to program participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2TOT1
JournalJournal of Extension
Volume53
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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community development
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Using ripple effect mapping to evaluate program impact : Choosing or combining the methods that work best for you. / Emery, Mary; Higgins, Lorie; Chazdon, Scott; Hansen, Debra.

In: Journal of Extension, Vol. 53, No. 2, 2TOT1, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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