Using needleless intravenous access devices for administering Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN): Practice update

Donna Zimmaro Bliss, Mary Dysart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Needleless intravenous (IV) access devices have been introduced into many clinical settings for administering TPN and other IV fluids to decrease the risks of needle-stick injury and transmission of bloodborne pathogens. However, reports of outbreaks of bloodstream infections in patients receiving needleless devices illustrated a lack of infection-control guidelines for use of these devices, their components, and variable staff practices. Revised practice standards from the IV Nurses Society recommend rigorous infection-control practices. All components of the IV system used in administering TPN, including the needleless components, should be considered a closed system that is manipulated aseptically and changed daily.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-303
Number of pages5
JournalNutrition in Clinical Practice
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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