Using Mobile Text and Media to Complement Teaching in a Facial Reconstruction Training Module in Haiti

Natalie Justicz, Joseph R. Dusseldorp, Jennifer C. Fuller, Myriam Leandre, Patrick Marc Jean-Gilles, Jennifer Kim, Tessa Hadlock, Mack Cheney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: (1) To describe electronic communication between global surgeons and trainees in a low-middle income country (LMIC) and to gauge appeal of the WhatsApp platform (2) To introduce a novel intensive ear reconstruction teaching module for surgical capacity building using simulation in a LMIC. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: University-based medical center in Haiti. Participants: Eleven otolaryngology trainees and faculty in Haiti. Results: Three months prior to on-site arrival, a WhatsApp Messenger group was created for information-sharing and distribution of teaching materials. A surgical curriculum was created to incorporate didactics, cartilage framework simulation, and live surgery. During the intensive on-site week, WhatsApp was used to distribute materials and to recap learning points from each case, with pre- and postoperative surgical photographs circulated. Postmodule written, oral, and practical testing was conducted on the final day, and a postmodule survey was administered a month later. Post-tests scores were significantly improved from pretests scores. Initial scores on the written, oral, and practical tests averaged 24.6%. Postmodule scores averaged 86.9% (p < 0.001). Participants rated the use of WhatsApp to be highly important to their learning and requested further use of mobile health technology. Conclusions: WhatsApp Messenger technology complemented a reconstructive surgery education module in a LMIC. WhatsApp provides opportunities for premodule patient screening, real-time discussion, and postmodule review. Its usage was well-received by Haitian otolaryngology trainees and faculty. Our results suggest that the combination of didactic teaching, simulated surgery, and live surgery resulted in successful transfer of both skills and knowledge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-770
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of surgical education
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding source: Facial Plastic Surgery Mission Fund at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, The Kletjian Foundation. Funding source: Facial Plastic Surgery Mission Fund at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary The Kletjian Foundation. Financial Disclosures: None. We would like to thank the Facial Plastic Surgery Mission Fund at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and The Kletjian Foundation for providing funding to support this project. Funding source: Facial Plastic Surgery Mission Fund at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary The Kletjian Foundation. Financial Disclosures: None.

Funding Information:
We would like to thank the Facial Plastic Surgery Mission Fund at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and The Kletjian Foundation for providing funding to support this project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Capacity building
  • Education
  • Low-middle income countries
  • Patient Care
  • Surgical simulation

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