Using differentiated feedback messages to promote student learning in an introductory statistics course

Qijie Cai, Han Wu, Bodong Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In light of the regulatory focus (RF) theory, an intervention was designed to promote student learning through differentiated feedback and then implemented in an undergraduate statistics course. Sixty-seven students were randomly assigned to receive the feedback that either fit or did not fit their RF. Results revealed a significant interaction between an individual's RF and the type of feedback received after controlling for the student's prior achievement. In particular, the students demonstrated better performance when receiving the fit feedback than the non-fit feedback. Further analysis of different performing groups showed that this identified interaction was significant only for the middle performing students, but not for the lower or higher performing groups. The findings suggested that the student's RF may moderate the impact of feedback on students' statistics performance, and this moderation pans out differently depending on the student's previous achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2016
Subtitle of host publicationTransforming Learning, Empowering Learners, Proceedings
EditorsChee-Kit Looi, Joseph L. Polman, Peter Reimann, Ulrike Cress
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages795-798
Number of pages4
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355083
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Event12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016 - Singapore, Singapore
Duration: Jun 20 2016Jun 24 2016

Other

Other12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016
CountrySingapore
CitySingapore
Period6/20/166/24/16

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