Using a Computer-Based Strategy to Teach Self-Advocacy Skills to Middle School Students With Disabilities

Kinga Balint-Langel, Suzanne Woods-Groves, Derek B. Rodgers, Ashley Rila, Benjamin S Riden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the effects of a computer-based strategy to develop self-advocacy skills for 15 middle school students with mild and moderate disabilities. A pre- and posttest experimental design with random assignment to treatment and wait-list control groups was employed to investigate changes in student participation and level of self-determination. The strategy addressed essential self-advocacy skills including knowledge of self and communication. Results showed significant differences in favor of the treatment group concerning student participation, as measured by student responses to the Self-Advocacy Self-Report. Generalization data indicated positive results for student participation, as measured by student use of SHARE behaviors, a set of social skills necessary for effective communication, in informal meetings with special education teachers. Implications for practice, limitations, and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Special Education Technology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • IEP participation
  • middle school students
  • self-advocacy
  • self-determination
  • technology

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