Using a boundary crossing lens to understand basic science educator and clinical educator collaboration in instructional design

Tracy B. Fulton, L. James Nixon, Amy L. Wilson-Delfosse, David M. Harris, Khiet D. Ngo, Leslie H. Fall, Bridget C. O’Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Collaborations between basic science educators (BE) and clinical educators (CE) in medical education are common and necessary to create integrated learning materials. However, few studies describe experiences of or processes used by educators engaged in interdisciplinary teamwork. We use the lens of boundary crossing to explore processes described by BE and CE that support the co-creation of integrated learning materials, and the impact that this work has on them. Materials and methods: We conducted qualitative content analysis on program evaluation data from 27 BE and CE who worked on 12 teams as part of a multi-institutional instructional design project. Results: BE and CE productively engaged in collaboration using boundary crossing mechanisms. These included respecting diverse perspectives and expertise and finding efficient processes for completing shared work that allow BE and CE to build on each other’s contributions. BE and CE developed confidence in connecting clinical concepts with causal explanations, and willingness to engage in and support such collaborations at their own institutions. Conclusions: BE and CE report the use of boundary crossing mechanisms that support collaboration in instructional design. Such practices could be harnessed in future collaborations between BE and CE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedical Teacher
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Instructional design
  • basic science educators
  • boundary crossing
  • clinical educators
  • collaboration
  • integration

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