Use of standardized patients to evaluate the physicians in residence program: A substance abuse training approach

Frances Rudnick Levin, Patricia Owen, Randy D Stinchfield, Nicolas Pace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Physician in Residence (PIR) program at the Hazelden Residential Program of New York City as a substance abuse training approach using standardized patients (SP) and self-report ratings. Using an objective rating scale, two experienced drug counselors evaluated four videotaped interviews carried out by housestaff pre- and post-enrollment in the PIR program. In addition, housestaff completed self-report ratings regarding their knowledge, attitudes, and skills of substance abuse. Of the 23 housestaff who completed both pre- and post-PIR program videotape sessions, significant improvements were noted in both observer and self-reported ratings. Overall, self-report ratings showed a greater percent improvement than the counselor ratings. The PIR program may be an efficacious approach to teach substance abuse clinical skills to housestaff.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-50
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Addictive Diseases
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 5 1999

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