Use of Medical Therapy and Success of Laser Surgery and Transurethral Resection of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

Seth A. Strope, Joel Vetter, Sean Elliott, Gerald L. Andriole, Margaret A. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To assess the impact of surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on use of medication (5-alpha reductase inhibitors, alpha blockers, antispasmodics), we assessed preoperative and postoperative medication utilization among surgically treated men. Patients and Methods Using the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims Database, we defined a cohort of men aged <65 years who had surgical therapy for BPH with either transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) or laser procedures from 2007 through 2009. Primary outcomes included freedom from medical or surgical intervention by 4 months after surgery (chi-square and multivariable logistic regression) and subsequent use of medical or surgical intervention in initial responders (Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression). Results We identified 6430 patients treated with either TURP (3096) or laser procedure (3334) for BPH. Presurgical antispasmodic use was associated with the highest risk of medication use at 4 months after surgery (odds ratio, 5.19; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.16-8.53 vs no medication use before surgery). At 3 years after surgery, 6% (95% CI, 4%-8%) of laser-treated and 4% (95% CI, 2%-5%) of TURP-treated patients had repeat surgical intervention, and both laser- and TURP-treated patients had an estimated new use of medication rate of 22% (95% CI, 18%-25% laser and 20%-25% TURP). The strongest predictor of intervention after surgery was preoperative antispasmodic use (hazard ratio, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.41-4.43). Conclusion Our results show a need for effective patient counseling about continued or new use of medical therapy after laser and TURP procedures. However, most patients experience durable improvement after surgical intervention for BPH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1115-1122
Number of pages8
JournalUrology
Volume86
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Center for Administrative Data Research is supported in part by the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences grant UL1 TR000448 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health, and Grant Number R24 HS19455 through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality .

Funding Information:
Funding Support: This publication was supported by the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences grant UL1 TR000448 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences .

Funding Information:
This publication was supported by the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences grant UL1 TR000448 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Funding Information:
Additional support for this publication was provided by the Washington University KL2 Career Development Awards Program (KL2 TR000450) and a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Clinical Investigator Award ( 1K08DK097302-01A1 ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Elsevier Inc.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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