Use of culturally focused theoretical frameworks for adapting diabetes prevention programs: A qualitative review

Vetta L. Sanders Thompson, Michelle Johnson-Jennings, Ana A. Baumann, Enola Proctor

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes disproportionately affects underserved racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Diabetes prevention interventions positively influence health; however, further evaluation is necessary to determine what role culture plays in effective programming. We report on the status of research that examines cultural adaptations of diabetes prevention programs. Methods: We conducted database searches in March and April 2014. We included studies that were conducted in the United States and that focused on diabetes prevention among African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Latinos. Results: A total of 58 studies were identified for review; 29 were excluded from evaluation. Few adaptations referenced or followed recommendations for cultural adaptation nor did they justify the content modifications by providing a rationale or evidence. Cultural elements unique to racial/ethnic populations were not assessed. Conclusion: Future cultural adaptations should use recommended processes to ensure that culture's role in diabetes prevention-related behavioral changes contributes to research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number140421
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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