Use of aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen and risk of endometrial cancer: The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

P. M. Webb, R. Na, E. Weiderpass, H. O. Adami, K. E. Anderson, K. A. Bertrand, E. Botteri, T. M. Brasky, L. A. Brinton, C. Chen, J. A. Doherty, L. Lu, S. E. McCann, K. B. Moysich, S. Olson, S. Petruzella, J. R. Palmer, Anna E Prizment, C. Schairer, V. W. SetiawanA. B. Spurdle, B. Trabert, N. Wentzensen, L. Wilkens, H. P. Yang, H. Yu, H. A. Risch, S. J. Jordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Regular use of aspirin has been associated with a reduced risk of cancer at several sites but the data for endometrial cancer are conflicting. Evidence regarding use of other analgesics is limited. Patients and methods We pooled individual-level data from seven cohort and five case-control studies participating in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium including 7120 women with endometrial cancer and 16 069 controls. For overall analyses, study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression and combined using random-effects meta-analysis; for stratified analyses, we used mixed-effects logistic regression with study as a random effect. Results At least weekly use of aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was associated with an approximately 15% reduced risk of endometrial cancer among both overweight and obese women (OR = 0.86 [95% CI 0.76-0.98] and 0.86 [95% CI 0.76-0.97], respectively, for aspirin; 0.87 [95% CI 0.76-1.00] and 0.84 [0.74-0.96], respectively, for non-aspirin NSAIDs). There was no association among women of normal weight (body mass index < 25 kg/m 2, P heterogeneity = 0.04 for aspirin, P heterogeneity = 0.003 for NSAIDs). Among overweight and obese women, the inverse association with aspirin was stronger for use 2-6 times/week (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.68-0.96) than for daily use (0.91, 0.80-1.03), possibly because a high proportion of daily users use low-dose formulations. There was no clear association with use of acetaminophen. Conclusion Our pooled analysis provides further evidence that use of standard-dose aspirin or other NSAIDs may reduce risk of endometrial cancer among overweight and obese women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-316
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Oncology
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Keywords

  • Acetaminophen
  • Aspirin
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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    Webb, P. M., Na, R., Weiderpass, E., Adami, H. O., Anderson, K. E., Bertrand, K. A., Botteri, E., Brasky, T. M., Brinton, L. A., Chen, C., Doherty, J. A., Lu, L., McCann, S. E., Moysich, K. B., Olson, S., Petruzella, S., Palmer, J. R., Prizment, A. E., Schairer, C., ... Jordan, S. J. (2019). Use of aspirin, other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen and risk of endometrial cancer: The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. Annals of Oncology, 30(2), 310-316. https://doi.org/10.1093/annonc/mdy541