US immigration is associated with rapid and persistent acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes in the gut

Quentin Le Bastard, Pajau Vangay, Eric Batard, Dan Knights, Emmanuel Montassier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about the effect of human migration on gut microbiome antibiotic resistance gene (ARG) carriage. Using deep shotgun stool metagenomics analysis, we found a rapid increase in gut microbiome ARG richness and abundance in women from 2 independent ethnic groups relocating from Thailand to the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-421
Number of pages3
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors are most grateful to the Genomics and Bioinformatics Core Facility of Nantes (GenoBiRD, Biogenouest) for its technical support.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance genes
  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Gut resistome
  • Human migration

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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