Urinary glyphosate concentration in pregnant women in relation to length of gestation

Corina Lesseur, Khyatiben V Pathak, Patrick Pirrotte, Melissa N. Martinez, Kelly K. Ferguson, Emily S. Barrett, Ruby H.N. Nguyen, Sheela Sathyanarayana, Daniele Mandrioli, Shanna H. Swan, Jia Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Human exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is increasing rapidly worldwide. Most existing studies on health effects of glyphosate have focused on occupational settings and cancer outcomes and few have examined this common exposure in relation to the health of pregnant women and newborns in the general population. We investigated associations between prenatal glyphosate exposure and length of gestation in The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES), a multi-center US pregnancy cohort. Glyphosate and its primary degradation product [aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA)] were measured in urine samples collected during the second trimester from 163 pregnant women: 69 preterm births (<37 weeks) and 94 term births, the latter randomly selected as a subset of TIDES term births. We examined the relationship between exposure and length of gestation using multivariable logistic regression models (dichotomous outcome; term versus preterm) and with weighted time-to-event Cox proportional hazards models (gestational age in days). We conducted these analyses in the overall sample and secondarily, restricted to women with spontaneous deliveries (n = 90). Glyphosate and AMPA were detected in most urine samples (>94 %). A shortened gestational length was associated with maternal glyphosate (hazard ratio (HR): 1.31, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.00–1.71) and AMPA (HR: 1.32, 95%CI: 1.00–1.73) only among spontaneous deliveries using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. In binary analysis, glyphosate and AMPA were not associated with preterm birth risk (<37 weeks). Our results indicate widespread exposure to glyphosate in the general population which may impact reproductive health by shortening length of gestation. Given the increasing exposure to GBHs and the public health burden of preterm delivery, larger confirmatory studies are needed, especially in vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and newborns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number111811
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume203
Early online dateJul 30 2021
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Jul 30 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by NIEHS R01ES016863?04 and R01ES016863-02S4 fund the TIDES study and, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of NIEHS (ZIA ES103313). The Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Early Environmental Exposures NIEHS P30ES023515. The NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease P30 ES005022; NICHD R00HD097286 funds C. Lesseur. Exposure measures were performed by the mass spectrometry core supported by NCI P30CA033572. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by NIEHS R01ES016863–04 and R01ES016863-02S4 fund the TIDES study and, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of NIEHS ( ZIA ES103313 ). The Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Early Environmental Exposures NIEHS P30ES023515. The NIEHS Center for Environmental Exposures and Disease P30 ES005022 ; NICHD R00HD097286 funds C. Lesseur. Exposure measures were performed by the mass spectrometry core supported by NCI P30CA033572 . The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Keywords

  • AMPA
  • Endocrine-disrupting chemicals
  • Gestational age
  • Glyphosate
  • Herbicides
  • Preterm birth

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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