Updated census in the Laurentian Great Lakes Watershed: A framework for determining the relationship between the population and this aquatic resource

Joshua T Fergen, Ryan D Bergstrom, Michael R. Twiss, Lucinda B Johnson, Alan D. Steinman, Valoree Gagnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Laurentian Great Lakes Watershed (LGLW) is a complex socio-ecological system that spans the United States and Canada and includes Anishinaabe Nations, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, and Métis Nations. However, this system contains overlapping political and ecological boundaries that do not conform, obscuring a true geographic definition of the LGLW and complicating the inclusion of population data in policy and social-ecological systems research. In this Short Communication, we provide a spatial framework for assessing the LGLW population using the watershed footprint under the Great Lakes Commission’s jurisdiction with international consistency to support regional science and policy, and discuss challenges in accurately assessing Indigenous areas. Using the best available sources, we estimate a population of 38,327,681 people (2015–2019) within the watershed and 133,737 residents within government-delineated Indigenous, First Nation, and Métis census areas of 2021.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1344
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Great Lakes Research
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Research Coordination Network #1940128.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022

Keywords

  • population, Great Lakes Watershed, multi-national count, census, indigenous places
  • Census
  • Great Lakes Watershed
  • Population
  • Indigenous places
  • Multi-national count

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