Understanding social connectedness in college women and men

Richard M. Lee, Steven B. Robbins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

99 Scopus citations

Abstract

A sense of connectedness for men was hypothesized to be based on relationships that emphasize forms of social comparison, whereas a sense of connectedness for women was hypothesized to be based on relationships that emphasize forms of intimacy and physical proximity. The results from this study generally supported the hypotheses for both women and men. For women, relationships that emphasized reliable alliance and not guidance contributed to social connectedness. For men, relationships that emphasized reassurance of worth but not reliable alliance or opportunity for nurturance contributed to social connectedness. Differences in how women and men construct social connectedness are discussed in terms of counseling implications and future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-491
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Counseling and Development
Volume78
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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