Understanding racial gaps in family shelter entry in Hennepin County, MN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of the disproportionate rate of entry into shelters by Blacks and Native American families in Hennepin County, Minnesota. Using administrative data on a cohort of families who entered Food Support in 2008-2010, it shows that Blacks are 3.1 times more likely and Native Americans are 2.7 times more likely to enter shelter than other families on Food Support. After controlling for family demographic characteristics, service use, income, and residential location, Blacks remain 2.2 times more likely and Native American remain 1.8 times more likely to enter family shelters. The remaining differentials may reflect unmeasured factors, such as differences in access to affordable housing and to financial and social supports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHomelessness
Subtitle of host publicationPrevalence, Impact of Social Factors and Mental Health Challenges
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages175-190
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781633216587
ISBN (Print)9781633216297
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014

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