Understanding Differences in Underrepresented Minorities and First-Generation Student Perceptions in the Introductory Biology Classroom

Jacob Jantzer, Thomas Kirkman, Katherine L. Furniss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We used quantitative methods to better understand the perceptions of students in an introductory biology course (Biology 101) at a small, liberal arts college (SLAC) that is also a primarily white institution (PWI). In pre/post surveys, we asked students questions related to their attitudes and beliefs about their professor, classmates, and Biology 101. We were especially interested in the responses and outcomes of underrepresented minorities (URM) and first-generation (FG) students. Our findings suggest URM and FG students have a decreased sense of belonging and increased perceptions of exclusion and differential treatment due to race. These findings can explain, in part, the disparity in Biology 101 grade and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) attrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere00176-21
JournalJournal of Microbiology and Biology Education
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded through the Becoming Community grant funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. We declare no conflicts of interest.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Jantzer et al. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.

Keywords

  • Attitude
  • Disparities
  • First-generation
  • Introductory biology
  • Kindness cues
  • Perception
  • Stereotype threat
  • Survey
  • Underrepresented minorities

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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