Understanding and Supporting Parent-Child Relationships during Foster Care Visits: Attachment Theory and Research

Wendy L. Haight, Jill Doner Kagle, James E. Black

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parent visitation, the scheduled, face-to-face contacts between parents and their children in foster care, is the primary intervention for maintaining and supporting the development of parent-child relationships necessary for reunification. A review of the child welfare literature, however, reveals that for some parents and children, visits are problematic. Indeed, parents and children's experiences of visits, the quality of interaction observed during visits, and outcomes for children vary widely. The parent-child attachment relationship is one important factor influencing the quality of visits. Attachment theory and research indicate that there are universal, developmental, variable, and problematic aspects of attachment relationships. These aspects of attachment relationships provide a heuristic approach for understanding, assessing, and intervening in parent-child relationships during foster care visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-207
Number of pages13
JournalSocial work
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2003

Keywords

  • Attachment theory
  • Foster care
  • Parent-child relationships

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Understanding and Supporting Parent-Child Relationships during Foster Care Visits: Attachment Theory and Research'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this