Type A behavior and its association with cardiovascular disease prevalence in Blacks and Whites: The Minnesota heart survey

J. Michael Sprafka, Aaron R. Folsom, Gregory L. Burke, Lorraine P. Hahn, Phyllis Pirie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Population-based surveys were conducted in 1985 and 1986 to measure the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) history and risk factors in Black and White adults. Type A behavior was measured by the Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS). JAS scores were associated with age (negatively), education (positively), and sex (men>women) but were largely unrelated to CHD risk factors. Blacks had significantly lower age- and education-adjusted Type A and component scores than Whites, more so formen than women. Univariate analysis indicated that a history of angina and/or heart attack was positively associated with the Type A score in both Blacks and Whites. Following adjustment for known cardiovascular risk factors, Type A score remained positively and significantly associated with CHD prevalence. These findings are consistent with other cross-sectional studies and suggest that Type A behavior, as measured by the JAS, may increase the risk of CHD in both Blacks and Whites. Follow-up of these cohorts may help to clarify the complex relationship of Type A behavior to the risk of CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1990

Keywords

  • Black Americans
  • Jenkins Activity Survey
  • Type A pattern
  • cardiovascular disease
  • prevalence

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