Two peers are better than one: Aggregating peer reviews for computing assignments is surprisingly accurate

Ken Reily, Pam Ludford Finnerty, Loren Terveen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

58 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scientific peer review, open source software development, wikis, and other domains use distributed review to improve quality of created content by providing feedback to the work's creator. Distributed review is used to assess or improve the quality of a work (e.g., an article). However, it can also provide learning benefits to the participants in the review process. We developed an online review system for beginning computer programming students; it gathers multiple anonymous peer reviews to give students feedback on their programming work. We deployed the system in an introductory programming class and evaluated it in a controlled study. We find that: peer reviews are accurate compared to an accepted evaluation standard, that students prefer reviews from other students with less experience than themselves, and that participating in a peer review process results in better learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGROUP'09 - Proceedings of the 2009 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Supporting Group Work
Pages115-124
Number of pages10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Event2009 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Supporting Group Work, GROUP'09 - Sanibel Island, FL, United States
Duration: May 10 2009May 13 2009

Publication series

NameGROUP'09 - Proceedings of the 2009 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Supporting Group Work

Other

Other2009 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Supporting Group Work, GROUP'09
CountryUnited States
CitySanibel Island, FL
Period5/10/095/13/09

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Education
  • Peer review

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