Two-dimensional echocardiographic detection of left ventricular posterior wall motion abnormalities using an inferior angulation view

Scott W. Sharkey, Richard W Asinger, K. Joseph Elsperger, Joanne Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two-dimensional echocardiography is frequently used to detect left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. Modification of the apical 4-chamber view by inferior angulation of the transducer provides a superior image for detection of regional wall motion abnormalities of the LV posterior wall. The inferior angulation image was prospectively compared with the standard parasternal short-axis image for detection of posterior LV wall motion abnormalities as defined by contrast left ventriculography in 63 consecutive patients. Posterior wall akinesia was present on the contrast left ventriculogram in 22 of the 63 patients. The parasternal short-axis image was judged technically inadequate for interpretation in 7 patients (11%). The inferior angulation image was technically adequate for interpretation in all patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the inferior angulation image for detection of LV posterior wall motion abnormality was 91%, 80% and 84%, respectively, vs 67%, 71% and 70% for the parasternal short-axis image. The differences between the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the 2 views were not statistically significant. These observations indicate that the inferior angulation image provides a useful plane for routine echocardiographic analysis of regional LV wall motion either as a primary method to detect posterior wall motion abnormality or as a confirmatory view to document posterior wall motion abnormality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-709
Number of pages6
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume58
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1986

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