Twins conceived using IVF: A follow-up of the family environment and psychosocial adjustment in adolescence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

STUDY QUESTION: Compared to families with IVF singletons, what are parental depressive, parent-adolescent interaction and adolescent adjustment outcomes in families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins? SUMMARY ANSWER: No differences were detected for any measured outcome between families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins and those with IVF singletons, despite high statistical power. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: When IVF twins are younger than 5-years-old, parents tend to have more mental health difficulties and poorer parent-child interactions relative to IVF singletons. By middle childhood, these differences may no longer exist and available studies with middle childhood-Aged IVF twins challenge the expected long-Term implications of the early concerns. IVF twins may even have more optimum adjustment than IVF singletons in middle childhood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Study of 280, 11-17-year-old IVF children (n = 122 twins and n = 158 singletons) from 195 families at a US reproductive endocrinology clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD: At Wave 1, clinic patients with an IVF child born between 1998 and 2004 were invited to participate in an online survey. In this follow-up study, mothers and fathers provided information on each of their 11-17-year-old IVF adolescents. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were no differences between 11-and 17-year-old IVF twins and IVF singletons in parent depressive symptoms, parent-adolescent interactions or adolescent adjustment outcomes. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: Although the family demographics are representative of IVF patients, participants were drawn from one US clinic. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Study results provide reassurance that by adolescence IVF twins and their families function as well as IVF singletons and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2765-2771
Number of pages7
JournalHuman Reproduction
Volume31
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Social Adjustment
Patient Advocacy
Endocrinology
Fathers
Mental Health
Demography
Depression

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Family relationships
  • IVF
  • Psychosocial adjustment
  • Twins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

MeSH PubMed subject areas

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Twins conceived using IVF: A follow-up of the family environment and psychosocial adjustment in adolescence",
abstract = "STUDY QUESTION: Compared to families with IVF singletons, what are parental depressive, parent-adolescent interaction and adolescent adjustment outcomes in families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins? SUMMARY ANSWER: No differences were detected for any measured outcome between families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins and those with IVF singletons, despite high statistical power. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: When IVF twins are younger than 5-years-old, parents tend to have more mental health difficulties and poorer parent-child interactions relative to IVF singletons. By middle childhood, these differences may no longer exist and available studies with middle childhood-Aged IVF twins challenge the expected long-Term implications of the early concerns. IVF twins may even have more optimum adjustment than IVF singletons in middle childhood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Study of 280, 11-17-year-old IVF children (n = 122 twins and n = 158 singletons) from 195 families at a US reproductive endocrinology clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD: At Wave 1, clinic patients with an IVF child born between 1998 and 2004 were invited to participate in an online survey. In this follow-up study, mothers and fathers provided information on each of their 11-17-year-old IVF adolescents. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were no differences between 11-and 17-year-old IVF twins and IVF singletons in parent depressive symptoms, parent-adolescent interactions or adolescent adjustment outcomes. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: Although the family demographics are representative of IVF patients, participants were drawn from one US clinic. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Study results provide reassurance that by adolescence IVF twins and their families function as well as IVF singletons and their families.",
keywords = "Depressive symptoms, Family relationships, IVF, Psychosocial adjustment, Twins",
author = "Anderson, {K. N.} and Connor, {J. J.} and Koerner, {A. F.} and Rueter, {M. A.}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1093/humrep/dew261",
volume = "31",
pages = "2765--2771",
journal = "Human Reproduction",
issn = "0268-1161",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "12",

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AU - Anderson,K. N.

AU - Connor,J. J.

AU - Koerner,A. F.

AU - Rueter,M. A.

PY - 2016

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N2 - STUDY QUESTION: Compared to families with IVF singletons, what are parental depressive, parent-adolescent interaction and adolescent adjustment outcomes in families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins? SUMMARY ANSWER: No differences were detected for any measured outcome between families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins and those with IVF singletons, despite high statistical power. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: When IVF twins are younger than 5-years-old, parents tend to have more mental health difficulties and poorer parent-child interactions relative to IVF singletons. By middle childhood, these differences may no longer exist and available studies with middle childhood-Aged IVF twins challenge the expected long-Term implications of the early concerns. IVF twins may even have more optimum adjustment than IVF singletons in middle childhood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Study of 280, 11-17-year-old IVF children (n = 122 twins and n = 158 singletons) from 195 families at a US reproductive endocrinology clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD: At Wave 1, clinic patients with an IVF child born between 1998 and 2004 were invited to participate in an online survey. In this follow-up study, mothers and fathers provided information on each of their 11-17-year-old IVF adolescents. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were no differences between 11-and 17-year-old IVF twins and IVF singletons in parent depressive symptoms, parent-adolescent interactions or adolescent adjustment outcomes. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: Although the family demographics are representative of IVF patients, participants were drawn from one US clinic. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Study results provide reassurance that by adolescence IVF twins and their families function as well as IVF singletons and their families.

AB - STUDY QUESTION: Compared to families with IVF singletons, what are parental depressive, parent-adolescent interaction and adolescent adjustment outcomes in families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins? SUMMARY ANSWER: No differences were detected for any measured outcome between families with 11-17-year-old IVF twins and those with IVF singletons, despite high statistical power. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: When IVF twins are younger than 5-years-old, parents tend to have more mental health difficulties and poorer parent-child interactions relative to IVF singletons. By middle childhood, these differences may no longer exist and available studies with middle childhood-Aged IVF twins challenge the expected long-Term implications of the early concerns. IVF twins may even have more optimum adjustment than IVF singletons in middle childhood. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Study of 280, 11-17-year-old IVF children (n = 122 twins and n = 158 singletons) from 195 families at a US reproductive endocrinology clinic. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD: At Wave 1, clinic patients with an IVF child born between 1998 and 2004 were invited to participate in an online survey. In this follow-up study, mothers and fathers provided information on each of their 11-17-year-old IVF adolescents. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: There were no differences between 11-and 17-year-old IVF twins and IVF singletons in parent depressive symptoms, parent-adolescent interactions or adolescent adjustment outcomes. LIMITATIONS REASONS FOR CAUTION: Although the family demographics are representative of IVF patients, participants were drawn from one US clinic. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: Study results provide reassurance that by adolescence IVF twins and their families function as well as IVF singletons and their families.

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