TV advertising volumes were associated with insurance marketplace shopping and enrollment in 2014

Sarah E. Gollust, Andrew Wilcock, Erika Franklin Fowler, Colleen L. Barry, Jeff Niederdeppe, Laura Baum, Pinar Karaca-Mandic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effectiveness of health insurance advertising has gained renewed attention following the Trump administration's decision to reduce the marketing budget for the federal Marketplace. Yet there is limited evidence on the relationship between advertising and enrollment behavior. This study combined survey data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey on adults ages 18-64 with data on volumes of televised advertisements aired in respondents' counties of residence during the 2013-14 open enrollment period. We found that people living in counties with higher numbers of ads sponsored by the federal government were significantly more likely to shop for and enroll in a Marketplace plan. In contrast, people living in counties with higher numbers of ads from political sponsors opposing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were less likely to shop or enroll. These findings add to the evidence base around advertising in the ACA context.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-963
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

Fingerprint

Insurance
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
Federal Government
Budgets
Health Insurance
Marketing
Health Surveys
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

TV advertising volumes were associated with insurance marketplace shopping and enrollment in 2014. / Gollust, Sarah E.; Wilcock, Andrew; Fowler, Erika Franklin; Barry, Colleen L.; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Baum, Laura; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 956-963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gollust, Sarah E. ; Wilcock, Andrew ; Fowler, Erika Franklin ; Barry, Colleen L. ; Niederdeppe, Jeff ; Baum, Laura ; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar. / TV advertising volumes were associated with insurance marketplace shopping and enrollment in 2014. In: Health Affairs. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 956-963.
@article{787ff2d44fbd4653bd5b5995ca5b0341,
title = "TV advertising volumes were associated with insurance marketplace shopping and enrollment in 2014",
abstract = "The effectiveness of health insurance advertising has gained renewed attention following the Trump administration's decision to reduce the marketing budget for the federal Marketplace. Yet there is limited evidence on the relationship between advertising and enrollment behavior. This study combined survey data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey on adults ages 18-64 with data on volumes of televised advertisements aired in respondents' counties of residence during the 2013-14 open enrollment period. We found that people living in counties with higher numbers of ads sponsored by the federal government were significantly more likely to shop for and enroll in a Marketplace plan. In contrast, people living in counties with higher numbers of ads from political sponsors opposing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were less likely to shop or enroll. These findings add to the evidence base around advertising in the ACA context.",
author = "Gollust, {Sarah E.} and Andrew Wilcock and Fowler, {Erika Franklin} and Barry, {Colleen L.} and Jeff Niederdeppe and Laura Baum and Pinar Karaca-Mandic",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1507",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "956--963",
journal = "Health Affairs",
issn = "0278-2715",
publisher = "Project Hope",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - TV advertising volumes were associated with insurance marketplace shopping and enrollment in 2014

AU - Gollust, Sarah E.

AU - Wilcock, Andrew

AU - Fowler, Erika Franklin

AU - Barry, Colleen L.

AU - Niederdeppe, Jeff

AU - Baum, Laura

AU - Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - The effectiveness of health insurance advertising has gained renewed attention following the Trump administration's decision to reduce the marketing budget for the federal Marketplace. Yet there is limited evidence on the relationship between advertising and enrollment behavior. This study combined survey data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey on adults ages 18-64 with data on volumes of televised advertisements aired in respondents' counties of residence during the 2013-14 open enrollment period. We found that people living in counties with higher numbers of ads sponsored by the federal government were significantly more likely to shop for and enroll in a Marketplace plan. In contrast, people living in counties with higher numbers of ads from political sponsors opposing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were less likely to shop or enroll. These findings add to the evidence base around advertising in the ACA context.

AB - The effectiveness of health insurance advertising has gained renewed attention following the Trump administration's decision to reduce the marketing budget for the federal Marketplace. Yet there is limited evidence on the relationship between advertising and enrollment behavior. This study combined survey data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey on adults ages 18-64 with data on volumes of televised advertisements aired in respondents' counties of residence during the 2013-14 open enrollment period. We found that people living in counties with higher numbers of ads sponsored by the federal government were significantly more likely to shop for and enroll in a Marketplace plan. In contrast, people living in counties with higher numbers of ads from political sponsors opposing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were less likely to shop or enroll. These findings add to the evidence base around advertising in the ACA context.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048049537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048049537&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1507

DO - 10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1507

M3 - Article

C2 - 29863916

AN - SCOPUS:85048049537

VL - 37

SP - 956

EP - 963

JO - Health Affairs

JF - Health Affairs

SN - 0278-2715

IS - 6

ER -