Tumor models to assess immune response and tumor-microbiome interactions in colorectal cancer

Ce Yuan, Xianda Zhao, Dechen Wangmo, Duha Alshareef, Travis J. Gates, Subbaya Subramanian

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite significant advances over the past 2 decades in preventive screening and therapy aimed at improving patient survival, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States. The average 5-year survival rate of CRC patients with positive regional lymph nodes is only 40%, while less than 5% of patients with distant metastases survive beyond 5 years. There is a critical need to develop novel therapies that can improve overall survival in patients with poor prognoses, particularly since 60% of them are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Pertinently, immune checkpoint blockade therapy has dramatically changed how we treat CRC patients with microsatellite-instable high tumors. Furthermore, accumulating evidence shows that changes in gut microbiota are associated with the regulation of host antitumor immune response and cancer progression. Appropriate animal models are essential to deciphering the complex mechanisms of host antitumor immune response and tumor-gut microbiome metabolic interactions. Here, we discuss various mouse models of colorectal cancer that are developed to address key questions on tumor immune response and tumor-microbiota interactions. These CRC models will also serve as resourceful tools for effective preclinical studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107981
Pages (from-to)107981
JournalPharmacology and Therapeutics
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank the members of the Subramanian lab for helpful discussions. We thank Mr. William Shawn Morris for assisting in manuscript preparation. Because of space restrictions, we cannot cite many other significant contributions made by numerous researchers and laboratories in this potentially important and rapidly progressing field. SS is supported by research grants funded by the Masonic Cancer Center ChainBreaker Fund, and Mezin Koats Colorectal Cancer Fund, Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Research Funds and the research funds from the Department of Surgery and CTSI, University of Minnesota. DW is supported by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grants TL1R002493 and UL1TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Funding Information:
SS is supported by research grants funded by the Masonic Cancer Center ChainBreaker Fund , and Mezin Koats Colorectal Cancer Fund , Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Research Funds and the research funds from the Department of Surgery and CTSI, University of Minnesota . DW is supported by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences , grants TL1R002493 and UL1TR002494 . The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Carcinogenic Model
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Humanization
  • Imaging
  • Microbiota
  • Organoids
  • Orthotopic model
  • Tumor Immunology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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