Triarchic conceptualization of psychopathy: Developmental origins of disinhibition, boldness, and meanness

Christopher J. Patrick, Don C. Fowles, Robert F. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

672 Scopus citations

Abstract

The clinical concept of psychopathy ("psychopathic personality") is generally considered to entail persistent behavioral deviancy in the company of emotional-interpersonal detachment. However, longstanding debates continue regarding the appropriate scope and boundaries of the concept. Here, we review alternative historic descriptions of the disorder together with empirical findings for the best-established assessment instruments in use with adolescents and youth as a basis for formulating an integrative, triarchic model of psychopathy. The essence of the triarchic model is that psychopathy encompasses three distinct phenotypic constructs: disinhibition, which reflects a general propensity toward problems of impulse control; boldness, which is defined as the nexus of social dominance, emotional resiliency, and venturesomeness; and meanness, which is defined as aggressive resource seeking without regard for others ("dysaffliated agency"). These differing phenotypic components are considered in terms of relevant etiologic and developmental pathways. The triarchic conceptualization provides a basis for reconciling and accommodating alternative descriptive accounts of psychopathy, and a framework for coordinating research on neurobiological and developmental processes contributing to varying manifestations of the disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)913-938
Number of pages26
JournalDevelopment and psychopathology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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