Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1993, a task force met under the auspices of the National Adolescent Perpetrator Network to develop a consensus of the “state of the art” in providing comprehensive systemic responses to juvenile perpetration of sexual crimes. This task force acknowledged that there was insufficient empirical research to guide many of their assumptions and recommendations and that they were, for the most part, relying on clinical experience. Out of the over 300 assumptions put forth in their report, three have had a profound impact on treatment, management, and research with youth who have perpetrated sexual harm. These are: (1) juvenile sex offenders are a unique class of juvenile delinquent; (2) that they require specialized, intensive, offense specific intervention in order to desist from future sexually harmful behavior; and (3) treatment of sexually abusive youth requires nontraditional techniques and may run counter to original professional training (National Adolescent Perpetrator Network, 1993). These three assumptions have influenced the development of treatment programs, have led to the application of sex offender registration, community notification, residency restrictions, and civil commitment to youth who have committed sexual harm, have served as a barrier to the application of knowledge from juvenile delinquency research to youth who have committed sexual harm, and have isolated research on these youth from research on youth development, delinquency, and other problematic behavior. In this chapter, we will discuss current practices with adolescents who have caused sexual harm. Our exploration will be guided, in part, by how the above assumptions and others from the 1993 task force have influenced treatment, application of civil sanctions, and the development of risk assessment methodologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSexual Offending
Subtitle of host publicationA Criminological Perspective
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages100-115
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781315522685
ISBN (Print)9781138697034
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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management
adolescent
offender
offense
juvenile delinquency
delinquency
sanction
risk assessment
empirical research
commitment
methodology
community
experience

Cite this

Miner, M. H., & Newstrom, N. P. (2018). Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm. In Sexual Offending: A Criminological Perspective (pp. 100-115). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315522692

Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm. / Miner, Michael H; Newstrom, Nicholas P.

Sexual Offending: A Criminological Perspective. Taylor and Francis, 2018. p. 100-115.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Miner, MH & Newstrom, NP 2018, Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm. in Sexual Offending: A Criminological Perspective. Taylor and Francis, pp. 100-115. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315522692
Miner MH, Newstrom NP. Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm. In Sexual Offending: A Criminological Perspective. Taylor and Francis. 2018. p. 100-115 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315522692
Miner, Michael H ; Newstrom, Nicholas P. / Treatment and management of youths who have perpetrated sexual harm. Sexual Offending: A Criminological Perspective. Taylor and Francis, 2018. pp. 100-115
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