Trauma, Trust in Government, and Social Connection: How Social Context Shapes Attitudes Related to the Use of Ideologically or Politically Motivated Violence

B. Heidi Ellis, Georgios Sideridis, Alisa B. Miller, Saida M. Abdi, Jeffrey P. Winer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study we examine how grievances and social connection among Somali immigrants are associated with attitudes towards radicalization to violence. Data was drawn from structured interviews with 213 Somali young adult men living in North America. Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the association of grievances with attitudes in support of political violence, and the mediating role of social connection (ethnic community belonging, attachment to nation of residence, and social comfort seeking online). Both grievances and social connection/disconnection relate to support for political violence, but in complex ways. Findings are discussed in relation to prevention of violent extremism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalStudies in Conflict and Terrorism
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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