Transplanting Microglia for Treating CNS Injuries and Neurological Diseases and Disorders, and Prospects for Generating Exogenic Microglia

Susanna R. Var, Phoebe Strell, Sether T. Johnson, Alex Roman, Zoey Vasilakos, Walter C. Low

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Microglia are associated with a wide range of both neuroprotective and neuroinflammatory functions in the central nervous system (CNS) during development and throughout lifespan. Chronically activated and dysfunctional microglia are found in many diseases and disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and CNS-related injuries, and can accelerate or worsen the condition. Transplantation studies designed to replace and supplement dysfunctional microglia with healthy microglia offer a promising strategy for addressing microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and pathologies. This review will cover microglial involvement in neurological diseases and disorders and CNS-related injuries, current microglial transplantation strategies, and different approaches and considerations for generating exogenic microglia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCell transplantation
Volume32
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work was supported in part by the NIH grant (R01 AI173804), and by the Suzanne M. Schwarz Fund.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s
  • CNS injury
  • aging
  • blastocyst complementation
  • exogenic
  • microglia
  • neurodegenerative disease
  • neuroinflammation
  • transplantation

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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