Transmission of information within transnational social networks: a field experiment

Natalia Candelo, Rachel T.A. Croson, Catherine Eckel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several studies have shown a relationship between the stocks of migrants and country-level investment in the home country; however the mechanism through which this relationship operates is still unexplored. We use a field experiment in which participants who are recent immigrants send information about risky decisions to others in their social network in their home country. The results demonstrate how this information influences decisions in the home country. We find that the advice given by family members and decisions made by friends significantly affects an individual’s risky decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)905-923
Number of pages19
JournalExperimental Economics
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was sponsored by National Science Foundation Grant SES-1025048. We thank the editor David Cooper and three anonymous referees for their valuable comments. We are thankful to Graciela Teruel, Manuel Castro, and several members of a Hispanic Community Center in a metropolitan city in the U.S., for their insights on the implementation of this study. We appreciate the valuable research assistance provided by the surveyor team from MENSA, Mexico, in the field. We also thank all the immigrants who audaciously ignored their fear, shared with us their decisions and life stories and allowed us to write this paper. Any errors remain our own.

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements This research was sponsored by National Science Foundation Grant SES-1025048. We thank the editor David Cooper and three anonymous referees for their valuable comments. We are thankful to Graciela Teruel, Manuel Castro, and several members of a Hispanic Community Center in a metropolitan city in the U.S., for their insights on the implementation of this study. We appreciate the valuable research assistance provided by the surveyor team from MENSA, Mexico, in the field. We also thank all the immigrants who audaciously ignored their fear, shared with us their decisions and life stories and allowed us to write this paper. Any errors remain our own.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Economic Science Association.

Keywords

  • Field experiments
  • Immigration
  • Information
  • Risk
  • Social networks

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