Transmissible and nontransmissible components of anthropometric variation in the Alexanderwohl Mennonites: I. Description and familial correlations

Eric J. Devor, Matt McGue, Michael H. Crawford, Paul M. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Data on 34 anthropometric measures from the Alexanderwohl Mennonite congregations of Kansas and Nebraska are presented. A factor analysis of these traits shows that body length and body width measures are distinct from each other as well as from measures of the head and face. Moreover, familial correlations estimated by maximum likelihood for all 34 traits tend to separate from each other along factor lines with correlations for body lengths being the highest and those for skinfolds and circumferences being the lowest. These results suggest the presence of various body “fields” which are under differing degrees of genetic and environmental control. We offer the term “functional multifactorial complex” as a means of referring to the joint genetic and environmental influences on these fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1986

Keywords

  • Anthropometrics
  • Factor analysis
  • Familial correlations
  • Mennonite

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